This is Why I Love My Job #2

Once again it is that time of the academic year when all graduating students and Research Associates are moving on to the next phase in their life; starting work or grad school in India or flying off to some grad school outside India.

I don’t have to write the nth time how much I love my job. But will definitely like to mention that it is very gratifying to see students achieve what they want to achieve and it is even more satisfying to know that, as a faculty, we play a small role in their achievements.

Below is the list of students (arranged in alphabetical order of last name) who have spent significant amount of time working with me this year / last 2 years or who are graduating with me or I have written a Letters of Recommendation (LoRs) for their admissions / job and are now headed to great places.

  1. Mallika Aggarwal: #classof2017 Has taken some of my courses, did a project spanning 2 semesters. Started Masters in Computer Science at GaTech.
  2. Amod Agrawal: #classof2017 Has taken many of my courses, did UG thesis on Privacy with me. Started Masters in Computer Science at University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign.
  3. Varun Bharadwaj: #classof2017 from NIT Trichy, #PrecogAlum from Summer 2016. Starting Masters in Intelligent Information Systems program at the Language Technologies Institute  at Carnegie Mellon University (my alma mater!).
  4. Juhi Bhatnagar: #classof2017 Has taken many of my courses, did UG thesis with me. Started Masters in Computer Science at Rice University. 
  5. Srishti Chandok: #classof2017 #MTech Has taken some of my courses, did Masters thesis on Privacy with me. Started work at Nucleus Software. Thesis | Slides
  6. Sahil Jain: #classof2014 Has taken some of my courses, has come back to be as evaluator for my HCI course. Started Masters of Business Analytics at University of British Columbia, Canada.
  7. Shiv Kandikuppa: #classof2016 Has taken some of my courses. Started Masters in Computer Science at Ohio State University.
  8. Saravana Kumar: #classof2017 from CEG Chennai, #PrecogAlum from Summer 2016. Started Masters in Computer Science at Ohio State University.
  9. Aditi Mithal: #classof2017 Has taken most of my courses, did UG thesis with me which contributed into a peer-reviewed research paper. Started Masters in Computer Science at UCLA.
  10. Priyanshi Mittal: #classof2013 Has taken some of my courses. Started Master of Science in Software Management at Carnegie Mellon University, Silicon Valley Campus.
  11. Bhavna Nagpal: #classof2017 Has taken some of my courses, did UG thesis with me. Started Masters in Design at IIT Guwahati.
  12. Mansi Panwar: #classof2016 Has taken some of my classes. Started Masters in Information Systems and Operations Management at Warrington College of Business at University of Florida.
  13. Ashwin Rajadesingam: #classof2012 from VIT, #PrecogAlum 2011 / 2012. Completed Masters at ASU a few years back, and now starting with Ph.D. in Information with cool Professors Ceren Budak & Paul Resnick at University of Michigan.
  14. Apoorv Saini: #classof2014 Has taken some of my courses, completed UG Thesis on Anonymous Social Networks with me. Started Masters in Computer Science at Syracuse University.
  15. Ayush Shah: #classof2017 Has taken many of my classes, completed UG Thesis with me. Working at IBM IRL.
  16. Yashovardhan Sharma: #classof2017 Has taken some of my courses, did a project spanning 2 semesters. Started at University of Cambridge to study MPhil in Advanced Computer Science and will be advised by one of the pioneers in the are of Information Security Prof. Ross Anderson.
  17. Mayank Vachher: #classof2017 Has taken some of my courses, was my Teaching Assistant for the HCI course, did UG Thesis with me. Started Masters in Big Data Program at Simon Fraser University, Canada.
  18. Manan Wason: #classof2016 Has taken some of my courses, did summer internship with me. Started Masters in Information Security at Johns Hopkins University.

Below is picture with most of these students. I sincerely thank each one of them for contributing towards my ProfGiri!

Here is a pointer to the blog that I wrote last year (2016) about graduating students and their next steps.

Hoping to see more and more success stories every year!

Precog: A to Z

Hi, all.

I (Kartik Sethi, B.Tech. Final year at BITS Pilani, Hyderabad Campus) interned at the Precog Research Group of IIIT Delhi in the summers of 2017 (May – July). I have tried to express my experiences through the following paragraphs.

A – Amazing was the word, which flashed in my mind when the programme started.

B – Best environment and bonhomie was the hallmark of the internship. I found the environment and infrastructure in IIIT as one of the best in any such institution.

C – Challenges. Every difficult problem is usually entailed with an innovative solution and every new solution is associated with challenges of its own. I also did face many hurdles during the course of my projects, but the peers at Precog were always ready to offer help and render their valuable inputs.

D – Deep Dive. These are the fortnightly in-depth sessions similar to WhatsUps (more about it in later paragraphs) where people get opportunities to share their project ideas, their ongoing project progress and take relevant feedback from other participants. One important aspect to gain from these sessions was that regular feedback is an essential prerequisite for any important research project.

E – Exploring new vistas and avenues. We got so many opportunities to learn and experience new vistas, ideas, and avenues. This was the first time when I got the taste of what real hard-core research is. I got to experience all the nitty-gritties related to approaching a research problem.

F – Family. The atmosphere here at Precog is more like a family. A family, who gels together, discuss together, sits together, enjoys going out together, dining out together and group members coming forward to each other like a well-knit family.

G – GPUs. Precog has many CPU servers and 3 GPU servers (two NVIDIA GTX 1080 and one NVIDIA Titan X Pascal!, currently the best in the market) with high computational specs. My projects were related to Deep Learning, so I had the opportunity to tinker with these amazing tools.

H – Hackathons. During the course of the internship, we worked on some challenging problems in the form of Hackathon(s) where all of us (interns, PhDs, RAs) brainstormed and collaborated to find innovative solutions.

I – Interns. I got the opportunity to work and collaborate with some of the most ebullient and brightest minds of the country belonging to various reputed institutions. It was the ravenous attitude of everyone in the group to crack arduous research problems, that kept me going and made me do better and better. Overall, it was an amazing experience getting to know them, work and learn with them.

J – Journey.

“Success is a journey not a destination.” – Ben Sweetland

My journey at Precog was indeed a roller coaster ride, filled with momentary disappointments (in not achieving the desired results) and spans of joyful triumphs (when I actually figured out where I was going wrong).

K – Keenness to learn. The atmosphere at Precog brings out the best in you. The internship serves as a great platform to gauge your research interests and work in the direction of the research areas which one likes to pursue.

L – Learning. My projects were related to Artificial Neural Networks (namely CNNs and LSTMs). The problems that I tried to tackle allowed me to experience a holistic learning in terms of concepts and ideas that have been tried and the improvements that can be ensued.

M – Mahasabha. Also known as Intern Mahasabha, it is basically a one to one session with PK, where we can share our progress regarding the projects and also if we are facing any problems. The session is informal so one can discuss about other things as well, even not related to Precog.

N – Nostalgia. Once a Precoger, always a Precoger! 🙂

O – Openness. The openness of every member of Precog is admirable. You can approach anyone for help (even the Precog Alumni). One will surely receive new ideas to try and also, there might be moments of constructive criticism, which is necessary for getting results in any kind of research.

P – PK. I still remember that awe-inspiring moment when I first researched about PK and the work that has happened at Precog. PK as a supervisor is the coolest faculty one can ask for. He is an epitome of a mentor who motivates, guides and supports you to a great extent. He makes sure that every individual in the group gets ample opportunities to discover their true potential and so that they can hit the acme of their goals. It was a fabulous experience to work with him as his mentee. He is truly the glue that holds this (Precog) family together.

Q – The Quality of research at Precog is at par with other research institutes in the country.

R – RAs and Pillars. Research Associates and PhD students (also known as Pillars), which I must mention are the exact manifestation to what they are to us and the group itself. All of them were very helpful. They guided us, motivated us when we were not getting the desired results. Also, everyone likes to be called by their names, so don’t you dare call anyone Ma’am/Sir here (not even PK!). It’s a statutory compulsion, and fines for those who violate it. 😛

S – Socials. The group is not at all limited to only work, we had regular fun outings, also known as #PrecogSocial. The outings ranges from PK’s place (yeah, you got that right!) to Barbeque Nation, etc.

T – Tenacity. The tenacious work environment and challenging projects kept me driving throughout the course of the internship.

U – Ultimate experience. The overall experience was ultimate at this institution, where one could learn to any extent.

V – Precog helped by giving me a Vivid picture of what and what not I want to pursue in future.

W – WhatsUp (WU). Toned down version of DeepDives (DD), these are the bi-weekly sessions (with the entire group), where Precogers discuss their projects, ask for suggestions and give interesting inputs. Through sessions like WUs and DDs one gets to know about the different frontiers of research happening around you.

X – The Xenial relationship that I have shared with Precog is something that I will cherish for the rest of my life.

Y – There is a strong Yearning to return back to this place, whenever an opportunity strikes. 😀

Z – The Zealousness that I have seen in every Precoger, to solve problems related to social good is truly inspirational.

At the end, I would like to mention that Precog is a wonderful group to learn, work together and there are numerous opportunities where one could excel. Therefore, if someone is looking for an all round and comprehensive research experience or want to make a career in research, it is one of the best places for him/her to start their journey.

Here’s a glimpse of the Precog family.

The Journey Known as Precog

I was interested in Precog long before Precog was interested in me. Ever before I joined IIIT-Delhi, I had an innate fascination with the field of Security – especially how it affected us all in the digital age. So imagine my delight when I found out that IIIT-Delhi had an entire centre dedicated to Security, a.k.a, CERC (Cybersecurity Education and Research Centre). Among the several research groups that formed CERC, one of them was Precog.

What interested me most about Precog was its focus on security and privacy, especially in the context of online social media. To me this seemed like an issue which was of vital importance, especially given the prevalence of social media, but one that not enough of us thought about. The second thing that caught my eye was the person behind the creation of Precog. Professor Ponnurangam Kumaraguru, as he’s known to no one at all, is the enigma who brought the concept of Precog to life. PK, as he likes to be called, is one of the coolest people on campus, or so our seniors had informed us. Now, having worked with him and having taken nearly all of his classes, I can safely vouch for this fact. PK is unequivocally one of the best professors I’ve had the fortune of learning from.

Precog’s 6th anniversary celebrations!

Instead of making this blog post about the work that I did at Precog, or the work that Precog does in general, I’d like to focus on the philosophy behind Precog, and what makes this research group tick. First and foremost, Precog is like an extended family. People here like to help each other out. And I don’t say that lightly, they really do! We are encouraged to make use of each others expertise, rather than remain confined in the silos of our individual projects. What really enables this sort of collaboration is the fact that there is no formal hierarchy in the group. Free of the burden of labels such as ‘senior/junior’ or ‘undergrad/grad’ everyone is able to mingle freely with each other. This in my opinion truly brings out the best of each person in the group.

Secondly, I’d be remiss to not mention the influence of Professor Randy Pausch and his philosophy on our group (Here’s an intro for the uninitiated).

“The brick walls are there for a reason. The brick walls are not there to keep us out. The brick walls are there to give us a chance to show how badly we want something. Because the brick walls are there to stop the people who don’t want it badly enough. They’re there to stop the other people.”

These words were etched in my memory from the day I read The Last Lecture, and are the same words that hang on a picture on the fourth floor where Precog is located. PK in fact likes to share this quote in the very first class of all of his courses. It is a testament to how seriously, these words and Randy’s philosophy, are taken at Precog. I think all of us in Precog can thank Randy for the motivation to keep on going, no matter how tough it got.

Another valuable lesson for me that got reinforced at Precog, was of steady iteration. We as a group deliberately try and make progress in small and consistent steps, rather than making huge leaps in one go. This ideology has personally helped me streamline my work process and achieve my goals with great consistency. Keeping this idea in mind, we have weekly meetings whose sole purpose is to get everyone to give updates on their work. This is beneficial in many ways since everyone in the group is kept abreast of each other’s work, and everyone in the group gets the chance to weigh in on projects other than their own and give suggestions that may be useful in that project.

Lastly, the great thing about Precog is that it truly embodies the “Work hard, Play hard” attitude. When we work, then all our time and attention is focused on the task at hand. But from time to time, Precog organises outings for the entire group – ranging from going to eat, bowling, playing games, having competitions or just hanging out. For those who say that nerds don’t know how to have fun, I’d like to point you to Precog. Precog is a group that is very capable of having some good old fun.

Graduating Precogs with PK. Celebrating before everyone heads off to grad school!

I’ve learnt a great deal in my four years at IIIT-Delhi. Many different people have given me lessons that I will always cherish and remember. Precog is definitely one of them. I owe a great deal of my success to all of these people who have helped me become the person I am. So now, as I embark on my next great adventure – graduate school at the University of Cambridge, I just have to say that I will truly miss all of this: the Whatsup sessions, Deepdives, Brainstorming Meetings, Precog Socials, and the people. But one thing I can confidently say is that I am Precoger for life, and the work ethic that I’ve learnt here will always remain with me.

To all my juniors, I present this piece of advice – take one of PK’s classes, work with Precog on a project. In the end, you will be glad that you did.

Yashovardhan Sharma, signing off.

Precog: The Quintessential Group

As curtains drew on the summer vacations of 2016, I was already planning on doing something constructive during my next summers. My mentor at IIT Kharagpur sent me a circular about an internship opportunity at a research lab in IIIT-Delhi. This is how I first got to know about professor Ponnurangam Kumaraguru and this supercool group known as Precog! I found the work in conformity with my interests and applied at once. After some rigorous technical rounds and interviews, I was informed of my selection.

On 8th May 2017, I joined the group. Having got hostel accommodation at IIIT-Delhi itself, I got settled in my room. Soon after, PK invited me to discuss the project I would be working on. My work was to analyse online social platforms through data extraction and arrive at potential sources of privacy leakage. The project targeted matrimonial sites. I was thrilled about the work and got started with it. This was my first experience as being a part of a research group. The working environment at the lab was something I had never experienced before. It was so conducive to efficient working that many of us stayed there even past midnight! I was surrounded by diligent people passionate about their work. Their thought process to tackling a problem and diverse knowledge left me awestruck. Everyone was very humble. At Precog, we were like a big family, always ready to help out each other.

Semi-weekly group meetings called WhatsUp kept the group updated about everyone’s progress. Fortnightly sessions called Deep Dives were meant to share intricate details of the projects to the whole group. Questions were asked and feedback was given. Solutions were proposed to resolve deadlocks. In my opinion, this is the driving force of any group, the ability to work together! And Precog exemplifies this. At Precog, you are never alone solving a problem.

Then there were Hackathons. The whole group would sit together for the complete day and attack one problem. It was a brainstorming session which promoted teamwork and learning. At the end of the day, the team would have figured out some solution. There were paper critiques within the group. This helped me develop a habit of reading research papers.

A majority of people perceive researchers as “boring” who don’t enjoy life. I had a similar opinion. Being at Precog made me realise how inaccurate I was. We had regular get together called PrecogSocial where we ate delicious food, played mafia and other games, laughed, talked about just anything but work 😉 Exploring different places in Delhi could never have been so much fun. Back in the hostels, we even played Foosball and billiards. My initial perception was completely shattered. Researchers are fun loving people too. It’s just that when they work, they let themselves be completely immersed by it. PK sums this up as “Work hard. Play harder!” 😀

PK is a source of constant motivation. He held an informal session with the interns called ‘Intern Sabha’. This was meant to break the ice between him and the interns. He possesses the skill of the getting the best out of his students. His experience is invaluable to the group. He can foresee the problems that might arise in a project and guides accordingly. This is what drives Precog.

Precog taught me how to function as a group. This is extremely important when you strive to achieve something great. I will always cherish my time at Precog. I made a lot of friends, met awesome people. Comparing the versions of me pre and post the internship, I can say this with certainty: I am better learned. The positive atmosphere within the group inspires you. It stretches you to your limits. The attitude of the group is aptly described by a wall hanging picture frame just outside the lab which quotes Randy Pausch:

“The brick walls are there for a reason. The brick walls are not there to keep us out. The brick walls are there to give us a chance to show how badly we want something.”

A picture of the group (mostly interns) at PK’s residence when he invited us for dinner:

Pages from a chapter called Precog

Back in 2014, when I came to know about Dr. PK, he was associated with Backpack, FindAWay, IDEA and other cool things that were going around the campus. It was very intriguing because I did not know much about him except that and the courses that he took. Little later, I found out about Precog, the research group that he has at IIITD. For me, Precog was this intimidating elite group that I would never be able to be a part of. But oh! how wrong was I and so are you if you ever felt that. Trust me, I am an insider. 😛

Fast forward to 2015, I saw many of my seniors going for HCI and very soon after that I realised the direction I wanted to do something in or be closely related to. Ever since, I fell in love more with the field so there was no question when DHCS was offered by Dr.PK in Winter 2016! I was more than excited, and that followed all through the course! Dr. PK is such an amazing professor. He makes sure that lectures are interactive, interesting, and there are surprise activities too – so giving you plenty of reasons to get up in the morning out of your bed. He builds up your assignments to your final project, and helps students get feedback from each other through critiques and himself too! He makes a lot of efforts to make sure students are learning hands on, which is commendable. It was one-of-a-kind course at IIITD for me, at least before I graduated.

I really wanted to work on a HCID project in my summers, and I started interacting with PK time to time regarding that. What is great about Dr. PK is that he is so helpful – he will guide you about interests and tell you about resources where you could find opportunities to even offering you to apply for an internship at Precog. I could not believe when he did that but a task and conversation later when I was in, I really could.

Being a part of Precog gives you a sense of belonging and the pillars (the scholars of the lab) help Dr.PK provide a learning ground for everyone in the lab! It is always fascinating to listen to him and if you can decide to implement on anything you learn from him, it has the potential to work wonders! There are several good things that are a part of the Precog culture. One of them is the mailing lists! Even though it has the potential of overshadowing all your other emails on some days, I think those discussions and looking at everything from a ‘what can I do with this’ eye makes you critical of the things that are going on around you. It is just one of the really helpful things I have learnt and I take forward from Precog to everywhere I go.

On certain days, the lab feels like a festival while on others you’ll see people working hard on their desks and in the CERC lounge – where even a peep will sound like screaming in a crowd. 😛 Now, I know I have painted a certain picture here, but believe me it is not all that rosy. Being a part of Precog is certainly an adventure in itself. You get to have a lot of fun but the people here, work so hard – sometimes it amazed me. I have had a stretch of time where I was afraid of working on a certain thing and I procrastinated. It only lead to guilt because I could not contribute to WhatsUp (the weekly update meetings of the whole group), which pushes you to finally try what you fear and get better.

If you have known Dr. PK for even a little time, you’ll know he loves to be vague 😛 To be honest, I felt off with that approach at first and I got intimidated but with time I have not only accepted that methodology but I am trying to apply it to my life currently. There are so many little things that you will learn from PK if you become a part of Precog or interact with him ever, little things that will go a long way if you closely listen. Precog is not just this but a lot more, something that can not be put to words in this post. The best part about all this is – for you precog will be totally different, it will be what you make of it.

The Anatomy of a Precog Internship!

It all began in September 2016 when I saw a big informative picture (image below) in my Facebook feed. In big bold blue letters the picture said “Internship 2017” with Precog’s logo on the right side. I had heard a whole lot of awesome stuff about Precog from people in IIIT-D and didn’t think twice before applying. The selection process itself was quite rigorous and after a few interviews I got selected for an Internship at Precog in the summer of 2017!! Add to that the fact that PK told me I could join right when my semester gets over and my joy knew no bounds!

I distinctly remember my first meeting with the group was at 4 PM on 2nd December 2016. Introductions were shared and I got to meet my mentor Srishti Gupta. She told me all about the work going on at Precog and what all projects were on offer. Then came the difficult but cool part, I got to choose which project I want to work on! Given my interest and background in mathematics I chose a project which involved modelling the spread of information across online social networks. I worked throughout the month of December and the winter semester. In fact I got course credits for my work throughout December. My college’s faculty were intrigued to know the kind of work that I did in that period. To some disappointment our research on information flow did not reach a conclusive end. And here I realised another thing from Precog, getting feedback about your work and then striving ahead is something that’s part of the research cycle. Disappointment is meant to strengthen your desire to achieve more. Officially beginning my internship in June 2017, I worked on identifying malicious users using modern graph theory concepts across the humungous graph of an online social network. Part of the work cycle at Precog are the regular update meetings where one gets to learn about what others are working on and also get some help about issues anyone is facing. This accompanied by fortnightly sessions know as DeepDive which as the name goes, allow the team to get acquainted with all the projects at a more detailed level. The openness of the group is strengthened by the fact that anyone (even PK) can be reached out to for help. With such amazing ly versatile people working in a group, there’s very slim chance that you wouldn’t find help about something that you’re struggling with.

If by this line you’re thinking that Precog is all about work, work and just work, get ready for a change of thought. The regular get together is aptly named #PrecogSocial. There’s only one rule about this get together, don’t discuss work related stuff. And the location can vary from Barbeque Nation to PK’s own home. Yes you read that right, PK invited all of us to his house for a feast. Get together aside, the interesting part about #PrecogSocial was the stories and anecdotes that everybody shares. The jokes, the games, the food, all of it will be cherished for a long time. Sir/Ma’am are a thing of the past at Precog, in fact everybody insists calling them by their name. If you try to associate the common academic stereotypes with this group and it’s people, you’d fail miserably.

If you’re a hardware fanatic (I am too :p), you’d be even happier at Precog. Want to run a deep learning model and want the results fast? Why not, use one of the many Nvidia GTX 1080s. Want to run it even faster and feel the raw power of GPUs? Go ahead and use the Titan X Pascal, awarded to Precog specially by Nvidia. And even if you’re not the GPU type, one of the many high performance servers are at your disposal. This is backed up by really fast NAS servers for all your storage needs. Although I haven’t been able to use the GPUs till now because my work doesn’t entail their use, I wouldn’t miss any opportunity to play around with them.

The Precog experience has been absolutely amazing for me right from the beginning. There was no shred of doubt in my mind when I decided to continue my work here after the official internship period ended. As many Precog alums say, Precog is not just a research group, it is a family. A family consisting of people who are awesome at what they do simply because they absolutely love doing it. As the great Randy Pausch once said “Follow your passions, believe in karma, and you won’t have to chase your dreams, they will come to you.”

Here’s a picture of the team at Barbeque Nation for one of the #PrecogSocial

Precog: A Family Affair

Before joining IIIT-Delhi, my father and I sat together to go through the list of faculty members who would teach me. We were awed by them all but some names stood out, one being PK’s. I read about his achievements and was eager to enroll in one of his courses when I joined IIIT-Delhi. After completing my first year, I was presented with several domains within computer science which I did not know existed; I wanted to explore them all. During the same time, Backpack was a hot product which students and professors were gushing about. I was told that a few of PK’s students had created Backpack and my interest in working with PK increased. However, it wasn’t until my third year that I actually met him.

I enrolled for DHCS, a CSE course on Human-Computer Interaction — the first of its kind in India. I liked the work we did in the course and wanted to dig deeper into this domain. This led me to become a Precog intern in the Summer of 2016. I worked with Dr. Niharika Sachdeva (recently received her Ph.D. from the group) to analyse the satisfaction of citizens after police response to their complaints. I also evaluated the Android applications that the police had released for use by the people.

Pic: Precog Interns: Summer of 2016

My association with Precog and PK continued as my last year at IIITD rolled in. I took up a BTP, collaborating with another faculty member on campus — Professor Shriram Venkatraman — to study the social impacts of Killfie. I enjoyed the research immensely and learned more than I could ever hope to. I was given the freedom to work on a project I liked, making it more fun.

The culture at Precog is imbibed with working smart and partying hard. Regular socials (where everyone interacts with each other informally) ensure we know people from different projects, making Precog a research family rather than just a research group. The openness with which we greet each other (we can’t call anyone Sir/Ma’am, not the PhD scholars, not even PK himself) brings with it the comfort of familiarity I haven’t witnessed anywhere else. We have regular group meetings too, where everyone is encouraged to participate in the discourse, leading to a fresh set of eyes noticing something unique in the project.

At Precog, I met a group of people who were not defined by just what they did. Like the stars in a constellation, everyone had a different story to tell.

A stay of 2 months: An experience of lifetime

Like every engineering student, when I took admission in engineering college I had high hopes and ambitions of doing something big and worthy. But the monotonous curriculum, seniority dogma, student-faculty gap never provided conducive environment for research and those high ambitions somehow faded away. Engineering seemed to be limited to only what was there in textbooks. However when I finished my summer internship this year (2017) at Precog, I suddenly experienced a revival of my engineering ambitions. People around were working and building stuffs that are being applied to solve real world problems and being one of them was like dream come true! My stay at precog was the most enriching part of my academic life.

My project supervisor, Prof Ponnurangam Kumaraguru (PK) is the most awesome teacher I ever had. My journey with Prof. PK virtually began in fall 2016, when I took up his online course Privacy & Security in Online Social Media on NPTEL. I was looking for domains where I could apply my knowledge of computer science to solve real world problems, when I stumbled upon this course. Back then I was in 3rd year of my BTech study and was aiming for a summer internship at some premier research centers during my forthcoming summer vacation. Few weeks into the NPTEL course, I was so fascinated by the  course contents and teaching of PK, I absolutely made up my mind to do internship under him. Some time after the course had ended, I mailed PK with my SoP and CV, explaining why I wish to work at precog and how my interests and previous works align with the research domains pursued at precog. Few days later, I got a mail from him and after 3 rigorous rounds of selection process, I finally got selected for my much coveted internship.

My project at precog was on Information Overloading with Niharika Sachdeva as my mentor and guide. I primarily worked to figure out how the frequency of posting affects the engagement on posts made by police pages/handles on Facebook and twitter. Will write a separate blog on my technical work. Getting a conclusion from the large dataset was however not easy and took me weeks of failed analytics and experimenting with different statistical measures on the data. The best thing about precog is that it pushes you to your limits. I used to spend most of the time in the lab, highest being 18 hours. Lab hours never got boring, as I was always surrounded by hardworking and awesome people round the clock. People around were always ready to provide helping hand, be it professional or personal.

My most favorite thing at precog used to be WhatsUps  (regular meetups held twice a week) as it facilitated interaction with everyone, including PK, and also getting to know each other’s work. It thrilled listening to exciting work going around. Then there were detailed discussion sessions known as #DeepDive (a nightmare for me though :p) where one has to elaborately explain their work, codes, hypothesis, observations etc. I used to be highly concerned about DeepDives as I had to be prepared for most unanticipated questions and criticisms. The suggestions, criticisms and feedback however helped me a lot in refining the work done and coming up with better results. Here everyone was keen to help whenever I got stuck in something.

IIIT Delhi also had some surprises for me, that were to break my prejudices I had about educational institutions. I belong to a government engineering college; and being from a government college I am not used to niceness of professors and research scholars. I am used to professional barrier between students & teachers and undergrads & scholars. But starting from my day 1, I was extremely surprised how people were at precog. There is absolutely no professional protocol existing, like addressing research scholars as sir/madam, following a strict formal conversation style with them etc etc. These were something I was never used to, and it took me some weeks to get adjusted to. Everyone is friendly irrespective of them being PhD scholars, MTech scholars or RA’s. We cracked jokes, played games, went out for lunch. The person who made the most difference is PK himself. He is the most wonderful and friendly teacher I ever met and is completely different from conventional teachers. He invited us for dinner at his place, watched movie with us, took part in fun games; somethings hardly any professor does these days. He emphasizes on “Work hard, play harder”, thus apart from work related stuffs, he organizes fun gatherings and outings (we call it precog social). My best memory with him is this selfie. Its the first time I ever had a selfie with a professor!!

What I got from precog is experience, and as Randy Pausch aptly says

Experience is what you get when you didn’t get what you wanted. And experience is often the most valuable thing you have to offer.

Being in Precog was much like being a part of a big family. It feels great being in such a group of highly talented and knowledged people working on really cool stuff that are making a difference in how online social media is used. I am super delighted to have worked with these awesome people. Can’t have a summer better than this!!!

Here’s the glimpse of precog family of which I was a part of.

 

On Precog, PK (and everything else that fits between the two entities)

So, what is Precog? A research group, a culture, a lifestyle? At the risk of sounding unbelievably corny, I’m going to go ahead with the last one. But really, it was.  

Ever since we had arrived at IIIT-Delhi almost four years ago, Precog (along with Dr. PK) had been one of the most “heard about” groups over here. Some of our batch-mates had already started working for Find-A-Way and Backpack, while most of us were still trying to work on our skill-sets to even be able to think of doing the same somewhere down the line.

Fast forward to the summers before the 4th year, I finally thought that I had the skills, and more importantly, the motivation to apply to Precog. There was no other professor or group at IIIT-Delhi working in the domain of Natural Language Processing, something I was deeply interested in exploring at the time. Hence, this seemed like a natural choice. The applications for Precog are a task by themselves, requiring a complete statement of purpose (SoP) and everything. I spent quite a bit of time writing this, polishing my resume, and finally applied. Unfortunately, I didn’t get in. So why am I writing this blog? I don’t know, you’ve been Punked.

Kidding. I spent the summers doing other things, tried to fill up some possible holes in that SoP and my resume, and re-applied for the coming semester. This time, I got the instructions for a task which was a part of the selection process, followed by the interview with PK’s senior students, and finally one with PK himself. The reason I mention these steps is that I was completely awed by them when the process was happening. The task itself gave me an idea of the kind of work I might be doing later on, which was pretty cool. The interviews were rigorous and detailed, a step one couldn’t cross purely by hand-waving. Come the semester’s first week, and I was added to the core mailing list.

Now, this addition to the mailing list, is a blessing and curse all by itself. We used to get like 5 emails a day, and this was probably an inactive day. Found it slightly annoying then, miss it quite a bit now. So, while we cribbed about these emails on a regular basis, each of us knew on the inside how cool they were. They kept us in touch with the latest items related to data science and even computer science in general, kept us updated about what other work our peers at Precog were doing, and while all this seems trivial when stated like this, it was great in that it kept the blood flowing – it kept us regularly motivated.

Other such half-blessing-half-curse traditions include(d) the weekly “What’s Up Sessions” and the “Brainstorm (BM) Sessions”. In the former, we all gathered to discuss in a little more detail what everyone was .. well, up to. Again, I found these to be great because they sort of gave us the feeling that everyone cares about every project. Ideas for all projects were discussed by everyone, all opinions were taken into consideration. When a group was writing a paper, it was presented to and reviewed by everyone. This was probably one of the practices that I think is somewhat unique to Precog. As undergrads, we did not spend all our time working in the same space as the Ph.D students and the RAs, and hence, it was these sessions that helped us build rapports with other Precog members.

The mentorship was amazing as well. I joined the text-team with Indira Sen, Kushagra Singh and Nalin Gupta, with Indira mentoring us for the most parts – and I cannot thank her enough for being so unbelievably patient and understanding with everything. Apart from this, PK was completely supportive regarding well, everything – including other commitments (uni applications, exams, health, everything), and it’s really important to mention this because those took huge time chunks in our semesters. He also conducted a couple of sessions to help us with our SoPs for applications, which was pretty cool (apart from being crazily helpful, of course). We even got lucky enough to once get to interact with Dr. Hari Sundaram, a professor at UIUC.

One of my other interests at the time apart from NLP was Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), which interestingly stemmed from having taken one of PK’s courses in one of my earlier semesters. So, I along with three other batch-mates had decided to take part in a related competition. PK even guided us with that and provided us with constructive feedback for some of our work. Basically, the overall growth model was wholeheartedly supported, which was a fresh blessing.

Our presentation for the Designing Human-Centered Systems (DHCS) course project at BBI ’16

Also, great perks! Birthdays, Precog anniversaries, graduation, achievements (!), not a single occasion went by without a lot of activity on the mail threads and PK’s invites to the lab with sweet, sweet promises of ice-creams and cakes. Again, this probably sounds cheesy but it was these kind of activities that truly made me feel like I was a part of a family.

One such perk from Precog’s 6th birthday!

Overall, I think Precog has some great practices and systems set in place to ensure that all of us stay motivated to keep working hard, as well as have a bit of fun while we’re at it. I only have one regret – not joining early enough. So, a piece of unsolicited advice if you’re a student in your third, second or even first year – don’t hesitate in applying “early”. Unfortunately, I wasn’t able to publish anything in my relatively short duration here, but even then, the experience was nothing short of perfect and (needless to say) a critical part of my time at IIIT-Delhi and well, life.  

 

Standing on the shoulders of giants

Hey there.

My tryst with PreCog happened in my second semester at IIIT Delhi. I had been catching up with Megha Arora (PreCog Alum now MS CS Candidate at CMU) about what she had been up to, and I was pleasantly informed about this cool research group she works with. She also kept on going on and on and on about this professor who likes to call him PK. That same day, I went online and looked up PreCog and I was awestruck. My jaw dropped to the floor when I saw PK’s CV. I had to work with the coolest professor in town. I had to work with these guys!

After gathering a decent amount of exposure in doing research with the Program Analysis Group at IIIT Delhi, I applied for a PreCog Internship in the Summer of 2016. I was exhilarated with the task given to me as part of the interview process. It was a perfect fit! I have always wanted to build systems which help others in some or the other way, and my task at hand was to build a social engagement calculator for Facebook pages (apologies for the Jargon! :P). While doing this, I learned about writing a technical report as to how the system works, the perceived shortcomings of it and some exemplary statistics of popular Facebook pages. I advanced further ahead in the process and met Prateek Dewan and Anupama Aggarwal for the technical interview round. I remember being extremely overwhelmed yet anxious when I was told that I had advanced to the final round and I have a meeting with PK. I am thankful that they found me competent enough to join the group!

I have had the tremendous honor of working on 2 projects which boast of really nice disruptive technology that can change the way people use social media. One of them is in the domain of Privacy in Social Media on Mobile Platforms whereas the other project is in the domain of social computing, data science, and HCI.

Killfie was a god-send for it allowed me to explore and finalize the subfield of Computer Science that I wanted to specialize in. It was a humbling experience to work on never-done-before things aimed at saving lives, hence the term disruptive. What seemed impossible at first took a lot of toiling, mentoring from great people, and a collective effort of the team working on the Killfie project for it to come to a realization. I am proud that I was able to contribute and solve a problem faced by the youth of the world at the moment, and thankful that I was given a chance to work on the same.

Have you ever felt a warm fuzzy feeling when you look at a group of people and just absolutely adore them? That’s what PreCog was to me from the outside. Now, take the outside perspective and amp it up by a thousand factors and you have got the state inside. We all like to hang out, discuss interesting anecdotes, take advice from each other … you get the picture. The good part for me in this scenario was that I could ping any of the pillars (the Ph.D. students in PreCog) and bricks (everyone else except the Pillars) and they would be happy to guide me on the right path, be it personal or professional life.

I have had nothing but positive takeaways from my experiences at PreCog. There have been times when I have crashed the server and yet, I was just let of with a strict warning to be extremely careful with the same. I have had sleepless weeks with just me getting 2-3 hours of sound sleep per day, showing me that I can still push my limit in working. People have properly heard me out, and given me proper constructive feedback. I have been scolded and got back on track if I was deviating. I have been pushed to experiment and let my creativity run wild as well.

We are always reminded of Randy Pausch’s famous quote in the group:

The brick walls are there for a reason. The brick walls are not there to keep us out. The brick walls are there to give us a chance to show how badly we want something. Because the brick walls are there to stop the people who don’t want it badly enough.

I can surely say that I figured out how badly I have wanted some things in my life and how can I actually achieve those things. If somebody offered me the chance to start working with PreCog at an earlier point in my life, I would definitely take it in a heartbeat.

Below is a picture of happy PreCog-ers after having had a sumptuous lunch in the month of June of 2016:

The PreCog B(r)unch