A Summer at Precog

Prof. PK visited my college, BITS Pilani, Hyderabad Campus in March 2018 and gave a talk. The last slide said that he wanted interns and that was an opportunity I wasn’t going to let go. I applied, and after a task and an interview, I was in. The internship process was really smooth and all issues were dealt with promptly. IIIT Delhi does not let bureaucracy hinder work and progress. I love this fact about IIIT-D. There are many such small conveniences that make a big impact by easing out students’ and researchers’ lives. Everyone’s time is valued here.

The best things about Precog is its people. There were RAs and PhDs who led projects and discussions. Research sometimes can be solitary work and often prone to small setbacks. For someone like me, who was venturing into research work for the first time, the support and help from the RAs and PhDs was very necessary. I’m pretty sure all the interns felt the same. The people at Precog intellectually feed off each others’ brains. The internal mailing lists are a proof for this. I learned new things everyday. Where else will you get paid to learn a lot 🙂 ? I’ve learnt from each and every person during the 2 months I spent in Delhi.

The Team <3

The culture at Precog has been influenced a lot by Randy Pausch. For those who don’t know him, stop reading this right now and read ‘The Last Lecture’ or watch the talk on YouTube. I adored the Randy Pausch memorabilia scattered throughout the lab and PK’s room. We used to have a WhatsUp, a short meeting where everyone told the status of their work, every alternate day. I felt that the WhatsUps were like Scrum standups, except every alternate day. They were helpful since anyone who was stuck could explain his/her problems and ask for help. People also got a general idea of what everyone was working on and they would pass on relevant research papers or articles around. About once or twice every week, PK would ask someone to summarize a research paper. I did that a couple of times and loved doing it. From never reading a research paper to summarizing long papers, I feel I’ve come a long way.

At Precog, we had our share of fun too. We regularly went out to Nehru Place(good food ftw!) in the evenings. PK hosted a party for all interns at Barbecue Nation, and it was great! PK couldn’t be with us then, but he made sure to video call us. Many such small gestures show his love for the team. At the start of the internship, Prof. PK told us “Work hard and have fun too.” The people here made sure we followed that 🙂 . A new habit that I picked up here was playing board games. I was introduced to Catan and Small World. The fact that they still work together after playing Catan just shows how strong their bond is! (Those who’ve played the game understand this 🙂 )

The work at Precog has a direct social impact. Work on many diverse projects goes on simultaneously. Just listening to others talk about their work helped me learn a lot more than I expected. Isn’t it great to learn stuff without putting in a lot of effort. I was lucky to see the speed with which the WhatsApp lynchings problem was attacked. Seeing your solutions affect the world is a really satisfying thing. The Lab windows have research papers authored by Precogers taped for people passing by to read. Looking at the amount of effort the people here put in, I’m sure the window is gonna be full soon.

I’m writing this blog a month after my internship was completed, and this has helped me understand and appreciate the things that I worked on and learned in the summers.

I would recommend undergrads to do a research based internship for the experience. The lessons that I’ve taken back are helping me a lot. One of the most important thing that I’ve learned is that you have to be patient to solve research problems. Getting such an attitude adjustment early on in one’s career is like finding a treasure. Feedback from the RAs and PhD folks helped me a lot with setting expectations. Expect too much and you’ll feel overwhelmed/discouraged. Expect too little, and you’re squandering away your talents. I appreciate the help with finding the thin line in between. I now notice that full time research work is a bit different than working on a project with a professor during the semester. Make sure you like the latter if you are considering a research based career.

During my initial interview with PK, I told him that I wanted to see if a career based in research was the right thing for me. The internship at IIIT D helped me confirm that it indeed was.

I really thank Prof. PK and Prof. Arun for this great opportunity!

A tryst with Precog : My journey of 2 years, an adventure of a lifetime

I am writing this blog entry after an incredible period of 2 years of work at Precog, which has surely given me a multitude of tangibles to talk about. But, it will be the intangibles that Precog has left me with, which will be the hardest to pen down on a single blog. My time working full-time at Precog has had an overwhelming impact on my life and career. It is undoubtedly the differentiating factor in my life, which has placed me into the Masters program at Carnegie Mellon’s School of Computer Science. It is difficult to describe the feeling I have for my advisor, my fellow lab mates, how each and every one of them have inspired me to become a better version of myself, and how I wish to take all these people with me for my future endeavours. The people I met at Precog ended up becoming the most valuable resource I possess right now.

Two roads diverged in a wood, and I took a leap of faith:

Joining Precog as a Research Associate is one of the toughest decisions I had to make. Coming from NSIT, which largely has a placement oriented atmosphere I just wanted to get a decent job and work in the tech industry for a while; a job which I did land through campus placements. But something did not feel quite right. I had a feeling that my job wouldn’t challenge me enough. I wanted to try something offbeat, which is when I started searching for full-time research opportunities.

Based purely on my instincts (and definitely second-guessing myself all along :P), I decided to refuse my job offer, take a leap of faith and join this research group named Precog as a full-time Research Associate from 14th June, 2016. It was definitely a tough call given how all my friends were about to begin jobs with reputed MNCs, and here I was, making dumb decisions based on gut-feelings. Remarkably, I also wasn’t someone who was dead sure of going for my masters, yet I took the call of venturing out to unchartered territories. However, looking back at that time, it is one decision that I can definitely feel proud of.

Here at Precog we often talk about the remarkable strength of weak ties in life. I would like to iterate how it was some weak ties and cold messages that helped me apply for this RAship. When I look back at the last two years at Precog, it has been definitely been the most fruitful period in my life, and I feel that a big credit for that goes to weak ties in life

Burning the midnight oil, and surprising myself:

From day one, I began working on two projects at the same time, one having a steep learning curve and the other one being classic exploratory research. Both completely new things for me. In the 3 months that ensued my joining at Precog, I realised what working hard actually meant. To the point that it made me question the ‘hard work’ I had put in last 4 years of undergrad. I was learning too many things at the same time, and everything that I learned just left me hungry for more. For the first time in my life, I tasted the satisfaction one feels at hitting brick walls and eventually taking them down.

Most of my initial weeks at Precog saw me working tirelessly all night on one project, and then waking up early to make progress on the other. In these first few months, I truly understood how everything in this world is simple, but not easy. Simple, but not easy. The quality of both the projects ensured that for the first time in my life, I was happy to be burning the midnight oil; the oft sleepless nights that did not end before I hit my eureka moment were thrilling and enjoyable. This doesn’t mean that there weren’t phases of struggle, stress, frustration and anxiety related to work. I had my fair share of each of them. That is probably a part and parcel of every job. Attempting something uphill always entails these things, I believe. But at the same time, there was a constant feeling of content in all the hard work I was putting in, and I knew I would probably end up surprising myself at the end of it.

The first Precog picture I was a part of; Summer 2016

Making inroads:

One of the most exciting things about my experience at Precog has been how rapid my pace of work and expected delivery of projects has been. The idea that I was new and should therefore take things slowly never came up even in my initial days at Precog, which in hindsight has been a huge boon for my profile, as it enabled me to always punch above my weight.

There were specifically two project deadlines that I remember very fondly, because meeting them gave me a great sense of accomplishment at Precog. One of them was a deadline for my development project, just 3 months after my joining, and the other one being a paper submission on the Killfie project in December 2016. Being my first paper submission, it was really exciting to be a part of that group which worked together to pull off a whole paper in a very short duration. My definitions of what can be achieved in X amount of time changed considerably in just a matter of 6 months. And I had begun to realise the value this time spent at Precog will add to my life.

The people I worked with on both these projects have probably set such high standards that it’s going to be incredibly difficult for any other project team to match that. I can happily boast of a very healthy coordination and work ethics in all team projects I have executed at Precog. In both the projects that have defined my time at Precog, there were few recurring themes that is something to take lessons from. Both my teams genuinely believed in the problem we were trying to solve, the impactful nature of the project and had a clear understanding of what we wanted to achieve through our efforts. Both these teams had a very clear and candid channel of communication amongst them which made coordinating all tasks easy. Of course, having PK as an equal part of each team was probably what made this possible. Most importantly, all members in both the teams found immense satisfaction in the work they were doing and understood that at every single point, we need to put our best foot forward.


Whats Ups, BMs and Deep Dives: The building blocks of the Precog life:

Being an RA at Precog did not just give me a chance to work on some really impactful projects that I can proudly call my own, but it gave me a chance to immerse myself in a research environment completely. As an RA, my involvement was never limited to the projects I was working on, but the atmosphere at Precog was such that I was aware of every single project in the lab. The opportunity to think in so many different directions at once, and to indirectly contribute to a host of different ideas in my domain was instrumental in shaping my aspirations for the future.

Weekly scrum sessions (Whats Up), Bi-weekly paper reading sessions (BMs –  short for brainstorming sessions) and detailed project updates (Deep Dives) are the way of life at Precog. These sessions kept us up-to-speed with the work not just other Precogs are doing, but also helped us learn from the problems that other eminent researchers in our domain are exploring. By investing time in brainstorming with other Precogs, I have no doubts that I’ve probably learned as much out of their projects, as I have through my own.

My third day at Precog, saw me taking part in a Brainstorming session with the group. The was probably the first time I actually enjoyed reading a research paper, and definitely the first time I critically discussed a paper in a group. It was the first time reading a paper did not feel like a burden, which eased me into the idea of research.

The first Deep Dive I had, I was thrashed by the group’s questions. I will always distinctly remember that day. I realised that spending time and effort on coding different parts of the project was not enough. My first Deep Dive prompted me to know my work in and out, and well enough to answer all the Why’s and the How’s there could be.

This holistic learning environment made sure that no one at Precog felt alienated from the other things going around in the lab. The Whats Ups, BMs and the Deep Dives ensured that we as Precogs stayed on top of our game, as well as critically examined everyone else’s. Without a doubt, having these as a part of the Precog culture minimized the loopholes we had in our projects and pushed us closer to success in our work.

Working ‘with’ PK, my advisor:

June 27th, 2017

The group of RAs at Precog were visiting this reputed university in Delhi, to conduct a day-long workshop on Machine Learning with their undergraduate students. A part of the conversation that ensued with the college dean is as follows:

Dean (to PK): All these RAs work full time under you? (referring to us)
PK: No, they do not work under me, they work with me.

This one incident is fresh in my memory like the day it happened and speaks volumes about PK’s character.

This blog would be incomplete without giving a glimpse of how incredible a professor PK is. Have you ever played cricket with your professor/advisor? Have you ever had social meet-ups with your profs/advisor till 12am in the night? Have you had the chance to do candid weekly meetings with your professor to just share your honest feelings about everything? I guess not), and that’s why PK is one of the coolest people you’ll get a chance to work with. The work hard and play hard slogan is something that PK (and everyone at Precog for that matter) takes very seriously.

Conversations with PK were always so frank and candid that I ended up feeling a little wiser at the end of each meeting with him. His habit of imploring the group mailing list for inputs on various things always kept the energy high in the group.

PK always has immense faith in all the people that work with him, and that was something I wasn’t too well versed with life in my undergrad. And I can probably pin-point that as the single most important factor behind everything I was able to achieve at Precog.

Working at Precog fundamentally developed in me the belief that brick walls are not the end of the road. I feel that delta change in myself, from someone who used to get jitters looking at hard problems, to someone who believes that given time and effort any problem is solvable. (Remember, simple but not easy?) A huge factor in being able to develop this attitude is PK’s constant motivation to take ownership of our projects. PK has perpetuated this beautiful culture in Precog, wherein if you’re a part of something, then it also means you have the power to take important decisions on that project, which I believe is rare. Coming from an entirely different college environment as compared to IIIT Delhi, it was initially difficult to get adjusted to working with a person who gave me so much freedom to express my ideas. I truly thank him for giving me the opportunity to work with the group.

Bits and pieces of ‘PKs philosophies’ like this will continue to stay with me and inspire me as bigger challenges await in life.

Picture with PK; taken in Jan 2018

The IIIT Delhi influence:

Even though my experience was largely concentrated to being at the Precog lab, being a part of IIIT Delhi was a major advantage. Working at IIIT Delhi helped me not lose touch with the academia and introduced me to countless pioneers. Working here ensured that my learning wasn’t limited to just what happened at Precog, but expanded to what other students and professors at IIIT Delhi were doing. In IIIT Delhi, I had found a second home after my undergrad, and I can feel the difference it has made in my life.

The IIIT Delhi atmosphere was always abuzz with a host of technical events to learn from and participate in. Even though my association was with Precog, I was able to audit the amazing courses at IIIT Delhi, participate and volunteer for the workshops happening in the institute.

The most memorable for me was being able to audit the Designing Human-Centered Systems (DHCS) course. I ended up spending way too much time (happily) in the course activities than I initially thought I would, and at some point you couldn’t differentiate me from an actual IIITD student taking the course. The BBI presentation for the course (plus the countless nights we spend preparing for it), was one of the most enjoyable days I have spent at IIIT Delhi. Building our project with my team was an experience I’d trade for nothing else.

The one with the HOWL project team

I will fondly recall attending poster presentations from random courses in IIIT Delhi, and even judging a few. The thesis defense presentations I attended gave me a deep insight into the kind of problems people are solving. The symposiums and the winter schools I volunteered for made sure I was learning way more than my ‘job’ was supposed to teach me. I am sure that the IIIT Delhi environment had something to do with me sitting here at Carnegie Mellon, and I feel thankful that Precog was housed in IIIT Delhi. Probably it played just as important a part as Precog did. Bottom line being, your advisor, peers and the work ethics are not the only thing that matter, your environment plays a pivotal part too.

Pushing the boundaries of learning: 

Just like the influence of IIIT Delhi allowed me to grow beyond what I was doing at Precog, the connections that PK has built at Precog provided many wonderful learning opportunities to me.

For instance, I was given the opportunity to be a Teaching Assistant for two online courses on NPTEL, something that lies beyond the ‘job description’ of an RA. Working on a development project deployed in the real world allowed me to constantly interact with users and gain a wholesome perspective of product management. I was given the responsibility of leading hands-on workshop sessions at symposiums, winter-schools and summer workshops that Precog conducted. These were things that made me grow in more ways than I expected out of being at RA at Precog, when I joined. All of this was made possible by the incredible connections PK has with the academia and industry.

The most memorable of these events was the summer school organized at IIIT Hyderabad by us. I decided to single out this experience because it was a turning point for me in some manner. I thoroughly enjoyed working with a group of ~70 students, leading workshop sessions on privacy and data science. It also allowed me to interact with grad students at IIIT Hyderabad. The confidence boost I gained after spending that week at IIIT Hyderabad, was something I carried for a long time with me. It was a much needed break, which allowed me to re-adjust my focus in life before the much dreaded period of grad school applications began.

Our team of volunteers at IIIT Hyderabad

Opportunities like this not only made sure I strengthened my hold on what I was learning at Precog, but also helped me gain great confidence in talking about my work. It helped me improve my public speaking abilities. For the first time in my life, it allowed me to share my knowledge with others. Explaining a concept to a room full of undergraduates, and seeing their satisfaction at having learned something new from me was indeed a rewarding experience. It taught me the importance of communicating my point in a concise and effective manner.

These opportunities ensured that life at Precog wasn’t confined within the four walls of the lab for me. My work gave me multiple opportunities to travel, make new connections and gain varied perspectives. I didn’t just add things to my profile for the 2 years I worked at Precog, my way of thinking changed in a lot of intangible ways.

The small world phenomenon:

It is also important for me to highlight just how far the support structure of Precog extends. One of the most inspiring things at Precog is the influence of its alumni who have gone on to study/work at amazing places in the world. The best part is the connect all alums still have with PK and Precog. In the process of their visits to Precog, we were very fortunate to learn about their experiences and information about their institutions/ companies was something worth gold for us. The insights that I gained through these alumni visits not only helped me in my projects at Precogs and my knowledge, but it also had a significant impact on my grad school applications. So much so that while writing my applications, I never felt like a lone warrior, but like I had the support and the knowledge pool of the whole group along with me.

Being a part of Precog truly reinforces the small world philosophy, because Precog alums are everywhere, and you can trust them to have your backs. And I can proudly say that not just for the sake of it, but through my experience here. I have found great support from every single Precog alum I have reached out to, despite the fact that I had never met them (nor did they know about my existence). A simple message saying “I work with Precog/PK” was enough to seek help when you would least expect it. I cannot stress enough on the importance of connections like this in life.  These incidents time and again reiterate the value of the entity Precog has become today. It is a testament to its legacy. It further motivates me in my effort to support my peers and future Precogs no matter where I am in the world.

The Precog fam:

On my second day itself, when I barely knew everyone’s names in the lab, these people dragged me to a social outing. If you talk to people at Precog casually, you’ll be surprised to know that majority of us would account for something like that in their first week with the group. Breaking the ice was never a hurdle with Precogs, everyone was welcome, whenever.

I always found it funny how I stayed at home for the 4 years of undergrad (since college was nearby), and my hostel life began when I started working at Precog. This blog would be incomplete, and wouldn’t do enough justice to life at Precog, without a mention of how supportive the Precog family was during that phase. Long discussions on winter nights over tea, over-analysing everything under the sun, having paranthas at 3am in the IIIT Delhi canteen and playing 6 hour long board games will be dearly missed.

I was blessed to find better project partners then I could ever ask for, and an incredible roommate for my hostel life. I set out to find a roommate, and probably a friend, but I ended up finding a brother in him. And I will forever be thankful to life for him.

All #PrecogSocials we had are fresh in my memory as the day they happened. The fact that my fellow Precogs even end up seeing me off at the airport tells you how special the bond is.

One with (most of) the Precog fam. I loved interacting with every single person in the picture.

I probably cannot stress enough how cool and special every single person in the Precog family is. And I’m not even talking about their work. Surely, I had the chance of working with some of the stalwarts in my domain, which was an incredible learning experience. But these were a bunch of people with whom you could have intense technical discussions going on for hours, as well spend the whole night cracking jokes and making memories of a lifetime. You could expect help at even 3am in the night; asking questions was never looked down upon and such an unwavering support is what made Precog family a distinguishing factor in my life.

The PhD students with Precog are (aptly) called the ‘Pillars’ of Precogs. I consider myself extremely lucky to have had significant overlap with the pillars, during my time here. It is impossible to quantify the kind of impact the pillars have had on my knowledge and my decision-making process. I’ve lost count of the number of times the pillars covered up the screw ups caused by me. I’ve lost count of the number of times I was in distress and just one conversation with one of the pillars made life so easy. I’ve lost count of the number of times I discussed my career goals with them, and felt I was on the path to making smarter choices. Like I said, I wasn’t someone who was sure about going for my masters from day 1, and the pillars played a pivotal role in helping me define my career goals. I have gained a unique perspective in life through conversations with each one of them. Without them, I surely wouldn’t be sitting here recounting memories so fondly. Without them, I probably wouldn’t be sitting here. It was so hard to say goodbye to each and every one of them.

But the best part about working at Precog is that you can still very much feel the influence of the pillars who’ve left. You can still reach out to them for anything in life. They will still be my fallbacks. When the going gets tough during my Masters journey, I am sure these people would be the ones I reach out to, and I know for a fact that everything would be fine after just one call with them.

 

Picture with the pillars (missing Niharika ma’am)
A picture with the outgoing Precog cohort; One of the last Precog pictures I was part of

I applied to Precog simply expecting to learn about and do research, but I got so much more in return. I ended up getting my hands dirty with research, development, TAship, managing workshops, leading lab sessions, organising #PrecogSocials, taking technical interviews, traveling to cool places and so much more. Things have a way of exceeding your expectations at Precog, provided you’re willing to work aggressively towards your goals. And that is something probably every member can attest to. A thought I’d like to leave with the future, as well as the current Precogs – the more you give to Precog (in terms of the time and the effort), the more it’ll give you back. Without a doubt.

My ultimate advice to you would be to venture out and seek opportunities outside your comfort zone. Seek out the right kind of people in life, they matter much more than the work you’re doing. Appreciate the good connections you have made in life. Take a leap of faith sometimes even when you’re not sure of things, and it might just pay off provided you’re willing to put your heart and soul into it.

-Divyansh

My GSoC experience with VLC (macOS Interface Redesign)

Earlier this summer I got selected in Google Summer of Code to work with VideoLAN on the Project VLC macOS Interface Redesign. It has been a blessing to get a chance to work on one of the highest impact open source projects. I had a phenomenal experience. Let’s have a look at my contributions 🙂

You can have a look at my GSoC Project Page and Proposal

Feel free to jump right to the code

Our Team

Left to Right: Vibhoothi, Daksh(Me), Jean-Baptiste, Felix, David

Workflow

Let’s start by looking at our workflow at VLC. VLC has a GitHub Repository which is read-only.  We use our mailing list to send Patches. We also have a GitLab instance at https://code.videolan.org/.

For my GSoC project, my mentors created a clone of upstream at the beginning of our coding period. It helped to keep things organized and eased the process of reviewing. You can find the repository we worked on during the summer at https://code.videolan.org/GSoC2018/macOS/vlc

We have an Issues Page on GitLab. We used this to divide the whole work into subcategories. Further, I have made different branches and various commits.

Face-To-Face with the team

I was lucky to be able to meet with my Mentors along with Jean-Baptiste for a couple of days. VideoLAN was very kind to sponsor me to come and meet our mentors in Europe. I would like to thank them from the bottom of my heart.

During our meeting, we discussed various design aspects of several Media Players and how do we envision the new VLC design to be. We also clearly divided the parts that were to be done by each one of us (Me and Vibhoothi). This helped kickstart the work and proved to be extremely useful and increased the productivity exponentially 😀

My Work Goals

  1. Add a feature enhancement to Go-to-time popup (more details): Ready to be merged
  2. Draggable Panel instead of ControlBar in windowed video  window To bring the draggable-control-panel (currently only in Fullscreen more) inside the normal Video playing windows and test with multiple Video Windows (more details): Done and tested
  3. Title Bar Autohiding (more details): Almost done
  4. Make the draggable-control-panel as a View instead of a separate window. For now, just test with a plain view and see how it performs with an underlying video being played (more details): Done

It shows promising performance, hence in future – To extend it and have the actual panel as a View instead of Window.

Work in-depth along with code

1. Go/Jump to Time popup (branch: is9-goToTime)

It is a pop-up which helps you to jump to any particular time. To access it, you can do any of the following:

  • Press +J
  • Go to Playback -> Jump to Time
  • Double Click on Time-Elapsed or Time-Remaining (in the ControlBar)

Visual Difference

Features

  • Now you can add time in the hh:mm:ss format
  • Allows you to write bigger numbers, example: You can write 80 in seconds, and it will automatically convert that to 00:01:20
  • You can switch between fields with tab
  • You can use the stepper to change the fields

Related Code

How it is inside IB(Interface Builder), Xcode

A sneak peek at constraints

AutoLayout is a bit tricky at times. David taught me how to set the constraints in a way, that even when the language of the text changes, it still looks the way it should. It also takes care of languages that are written from right to left

2. Draggable Panel instead of ControlBar in windowed video  window (Issue 1)

  • Removed the fixed ControlBar and replaced it with a movable draggable panel. Just like the fullscreen controller
  • On resizing or moving the window, the draggable panel re-centers along with the window. There is a bit of a delay+drag as the panel is a window and not a view
  • The draggablePanel is constrained in the bounds of the window.

3. Title Bar Autohiding (Issue 3)

Window’s title bar (and its close / minimize / maximize icons) automatically appears if the mouse is moved over the window, and disappear again if the mouse pointer hides or leaves the window.

Implementation of Issue 1 and 3 (branch: PanelInMultipleVout)

4. Draggable Panel as a View

The draggablePanel was earlier a window. Having the draggablePanel as a window was creating a problem. When the video window was moved, in order to keep it at its place we had to programmatically move the panel in the same way. But a drag and a delay was coming in that.

So we decided to make it as a view instead of a window. After testing, it seems to have solved the problem 😀

  • It remains at its position even when the window is moved
  • Added the panel as a custom NSView

  • Created two new Classes `VLCDraggablePanelView` and `VLCDraggablePanelController` to handle the operations of the Panel
  • Connected all the components with the related class files

TO-DO

Currently, the buttons are non-functional. Discussion on how the classes and their instances need to be done, after which it can be implemented.

Things I learnt

  • How to work on a huge code base
  • Objective C
  • Xcode
  • Interface Builder
  • AutoLayout
  • Cocoa Framework
  • Git
    • There were numerous small and big things I learnt in Git and how to version code. Here are a few tips that you can make use of 🙂

git diff –color-words

To see the changes in words instead of sentences

git checkout commitHash

To temporarily switch to a branch at that particular commit, helps in testing

git stash and git stash apply

To undo/redo the uncommitted changes

git diff HEAD~2

To see the changes done since HEAD~2 (two commit before HEAD). Refer to this post for more options

git branch and git checkout branch-name

To list and change to a particular branch

Useful Links

Sojourn of an introvert at PreCog

“The Whole is Greater than the Sum of its Parts”

This was just another saying for me until the day I joined Precog. It all began when my friends convinced me into taking part in OSM-Palooza, a hackathon organized by PreCog in Spring 2016. The task was to perform sentiment analysis on Twitter code-mixed data. The experience was fun: learning basics of machine learning, text analysis, APIs, web scraping, automation, and what not. Finally, after working for several hours, our team made a submission that ended up winning the first prize!

While munching on pizza slices with the prize money, I started thinking about this experience, and how much I loved it. After a bit of research on what PreCog does and the people in it, my friend Divam and I decided to ask PK for a spot in the research group via a summer internship. After the friendliest interview with Prateek and Anupama, we were in. The summer started off with a lot of learning, reading research papers, watching video lectures, and exploring huge datasets. Frequent visits to Precog’s lab made me realize how it was different from other research labs.

One of several sessions of Precog; every single time walking out of the room with added knowledge :’)

Whatever research labs I had entered/visited as a college student, generally had students working in dead silence, consumed in their work and not looking anywhere around. Precog was much more lively. There is a fridge with chocolates that don’t usually last, bean bags for lazing around and the most amazing people to discuss your ideas with in a chillaxed surrounding. It has positive vibes coming out it. After working for that summer and submitting our work to ASONAM, an international conference (which ended up being published!), I made the decision to continue working with this awesome group of people.

As time passed by, I learned new things that I might have never stumbled across, shared with and by the lab members. Every email that would pop up in Precog’s mailing list would be brain food: I’d open the link and try to read everything in it. Doing this for quite some time helped me discover my passion for machine learning. It is this habit of reading these emails in depth that helped me start a project in machine learning in collaboration with IBM!

While PhDs from the lab and undergrads worked on my draft, submitting research work to a conference, I was reminded of the awesome group that I am a part of.

Apart from boosting my hunger for knowledge and helping me grow in my field and as a person in general, I owe whatever success I have to Precog. Being an introvert, I wasn’t too comfortable part of being such a close-knit research group. However, with encouraging mentors like PK, Prateek, and Anupama, I started opening up. From having a potluck lunch at PK’s residence to extempore plans to order ice-cream for lunch, I have come a long way in getting rid of my shyness.

From Natural’s ice cream in the fridge to hot pizza after data annotation sessions, from group sessions and constructive feedback to heart-to-heart talks, from the coolest PHDs in the lab to the coolest mentor and advisor I could have asked for, the memories I’ve made as part of PreCog are something I shall always cherish and carry with me 😀

The Precog Amplification

The summer break after graduation is when one realizes that IIIT has changed their life forever. It’s too soon to say whether it’s for the good or bad, but “sitting idle”, “not learning”, or “not chasing something new” become the biggest worries of life. Fear not, the bouts of peaceful wondering (and guilt-free procrastination) catch up soon, but for me it was the former set of feelings that saw me hunting for something to do in the summer.

I got a glimpse of what working at Precog would be like during PK’s DHCS course that I took in my final semester. It was meant to be a light course that undergraduate students crave for in their final lap, rightfully devoting the residual time appeasing their friends before the great dispersion. Ironically enough, it turned out to be anything but light, though still served the purpose of letting me have a great time with my friends. BBI (Building Better Interfaces), the conclusive project showcase, was almost like a start-up convention on steroids with students going to unfathomable lengths – pitching their projects and getting validation on their design process from practically everyone on campus. It’s difficult to forget a course such as this where you have witnessed banner wars, basketball challenges, beer pong and simply students going all-out on their projects. The enthusiasm was contagious and getting involved with Precog over the summer definitely seemed like an option to consider. Despite the fact that the domain of social {computing, networks, systems} was completely alien to me, I was incredibly lucky to make it through as a summer RA (maybe I just rode along on our cool DHCS course project, Fettle).

Building Better Interfaces 2016
Building Better Interfaces 2016

The following month, I started at Precog on a development project alongside a bunch of enthusiastic interns. During the first few weeks, as I familiarized myself with the domain of social media analytics, I found myself get attracted towards a particular thread. Given the rapid rate at which media content is growing on social media (~2000 images per second!), it was a question that often found its way into discussions  – how can we summarize this enormous dataset of social media images and make it more succinct and browsable? Having a background in Vision and an inclination towards research I found a certain affinity towards this problem and I shared my intent to work on this idea with Sonal, another RA at Precog who had just wrapped up one of her own projects (and happened to be looking for a new problem to work on. What luck, right?).

People@Precog Summer 2016
People@Precog Summer 2016

sometimes having the right answer is less important than seeing behind someone’s eyes why the question had to be asked – source

As both of us delved into conducting a high-level literature survey, we found that even though image data set summarization is a well-researched problem, in the context of social media data it is almost unexplored. I was all in for pitching the idea to PK right that moment, but Sonal, the more seasoned Precoger, advised against it and proposed for preparing a more polished case for the problem, one that would more eloquently bring out some exciting use cases. This was the first time I got introduced to the concept of making people excited about your research  and it starts with your PI itself. The first question PK would ask is “how do I sell this?”, which would encapsulate the other fundamental questions, “who are we helping?”, “do they need our help” and “how can we help?” (in that order). As brutal and business oriented the line of questioning would seem, I could appreciate the intent behind it. It was not meant as a discouragement of open ideas but instead as a first-round validation of how well the involved people are able to make a case that the idea is worth pursuing. This constant reinforcement that the job of a researcher entails being an effective communicator and convincing an audience that the problem is worth solving was something very unique to PK. Once we had this part out of the way over the many sync-up sessions, the ecosystem was made extremely conducive towards carrying out the required research work. Instead of narrating the experience any further, I’d rather break the rest of it down into more consumable nuggets –

  1. The secret to all material success is self-discipline and grit – Be it your grades, getting an internship, an admit, building a project, coding a hack, or writing a research paper. If you can’t invest the required time and effort, it is wrong to expect a meaningful outcome. Yeah, you may get lucky once in awhile, but as Deadpool says “luck isn’t a superpower”. The 80 hour highly-organized work weeks at Precog, make sure that there is minimal dependence on luck. Keeping up with the expected commitment, Sonal and I continued working on our submission even after our RAship was over and saw it getting accepted to ACM Multimedia (you can read about how we approached our summarization problem and created #VisualHashtags here). This was one of the most rewarding experiences and only Sonal will remember burning all our stipend on Starbucks coffee, feeling guilty about constantly overloading their free wifi.
  2. As for non-material success, it is empathy and gratitude – Academia is a very competitive domain and one where no matter how much you accomplish, self-doubt comes in plenty. Peer-review doesn’t stay limited to academic manuscripts and becomes a part of everyday life. It becomes important to support your colleagues in their effort because with so much competence around it is often that one starts getting really hard on themselves. Precog is one place where you would always find someone or the other to celebrate something as small as a midnight bugfix with. You would have to be seriously off the grid if you haven’t seen PK leading from the front, encouraging and taking special pride in bragging about his students and their work.
  3. Diplomacy isn’t really a treasured asset in a research lab – The lab is devoid of any echo chambers because there are just so many strong voices. The senior most PhDs and fresh interns alike, everyone enjoys open channels of communication and get to navigate their journey at the lab. It was this environment that allowed me to switch projects with little friction and pursue a new idea during the middle of my tenure. It would be safe to say that with everyone here being absolutely blunt about their work and also with their feedback, I have started to adore conference peer reviewers (just kidding). The many reviews and rebuttals from Prateek, Niharika, Srishti, and Anupama greatly strengthened our ACMMM submission. (On a side note, I do think I owe an apology to Anupama for not being so server savvy at the time!)
  4. Collaboration is equally important as individual brilliance – Working in the domain of Collaborative Cognition, I can vouch for the fact that collective intelligence trumps individual effort in more ways than just performance (Spoiler Alert: Avengers: Infinity War is an exception). An expert in one domain need not be an expert in another, and that is how it should be. At Precog I learned that it’s a big fallacy that one skill is better than the other. It may be more valued than the rest in a given context, but then it’s a matter of finding a match. What matters is being a master of that skill. The knowledge sharing that happens when different people, each with their own niche, work together leads to diverse perspectives and hence, exciting prospects. Such collaboration is common to most projects at Precog; even including our work on #VisualHashtags, where we had AVS and PK, two experts in their respective fields, collectively advising us on our research problem.
  5. If something doesn’t make you anxious, is it really worth doing? – It is evident that people at Precog go places. Besides the qualification and merit gained at the lab, this success rate is because of the step-outside-the-comfort-zone attitude inculcated by PK. The bottom line is – a bunch of rejection emails in your inbox is much better than having only million dollar cheques from the Prince of Nigeria. Last year, I took the leap and applied for a few graduate programs in my area of interest – and to my delight received an admit to the Masters of Science in Robotics Program at CMU. As I start on this new endeavor this fall, PK being an alumnus at the same university makes it even more special – I am sure his mentorship and my association with Precog will continue in some form or the other.
People@Precog Farewell 2018
People@Precog Farewell 2018

Though my stint at the lab has been shorter than most, my blog entry and learning has been not. So, TL;DR: Precog is definitely a place to spend time at if you are remotely interested in rising from being mere nodes in a social system to being its philosophers and problem solvers. The line of research is highly interdisciplinary (Machine Learning, Natural Language Processing, Data Mining, HCI, Social Computing, Privacy and Security) and if you look around the projects here, you are bound to find something of your interest. It has everything to offer, from savvy GPUs to savvier researchers, and from cool projects to cooler friends. If you are ready to put in the hours, it’s an investment you won’t regret.

Precog 101

In the summer of 2016, I was a third year Computer Science engineering student at the College of Engineering, Guindy in Chennai desperately looking for a summer internship. A chance encounter with a senior from college, who was then a Research Associate (RA) here, is how I first heard of Precog. What followed was a year long journey in which I’ve gained mentors, friends and an admit at the Ohio State University for the MS in CSE program (Let me assure you that my time at Precog is what got me in). Here I try to summarize my observations on what makes Precog awesome.

What makes Precog Precog?

Extreme organization.

After working with PK and Precog for slightly more than a year now, I’ve seen how they’re meticulous about communication and scheduling. All communication happens through email, everything is written, there’s a separate email thread where you can reach out to the whole group when you need help or just want to share something interesting. PK occasionally sends motivating emails such as,

Are you spending 100 hrs a week? Just wanted to check with you….

All meetings are scheduled through shared calendar events, and meetings start exactly at the specified time. As PK says,

If it’s not on my calendar, it’s not in my life.

Collective intelligence.

The biggest advantage in being a part of Precog is that you’re not just one person trying to solve a problem. When you’re working on a problem at Precog, everybody is contributing in solving the problem in one way or the other, big or small. Therefore, you’re not restricted by just what you know. However, this does not mean that you will be spoon fed. You’ll probably get a new perspective on the problem or how to approach it which will eventually help you learn something new at every juncture.

Apart from just sending out an email on the thread, there are weekly “What’s up” sessions and monthly “Deep Dive” sessions where everybody presents their work and gets inputs from the rest of the group.

Amazing Mentors

One awesome thing about Precog is that you are never alone. There is always somebody who’s responsible for guiding you in the right direction when you’re stuck not knowing what to do.

In the one year that I was at Precog, I worked on two interesting projects with Anupama Aggarwal. Although I was told that she can be scary when she wants to be, she is one of the most hard-working and considerate person I’ve come across.

Constantly looking for important problems.

The people of Precog are constantly aware of what’s happening around them. Where others complain, they try to come up with solutions to make things better. The email thread is always abuzz with ideas on how to solve some very difficult problems.

The brainchild of one such discussion was the acclaimed Killfie project. What started out as PK sending out a news article about selfie deaths in India and asking

Can we do something about this?

progressed to become a full blown paper. To me, this is what is super awesome about Precog, the fact that they’re willing to spend their time and energy in doing super cool things that can make a difference.

Precog’s ability to attract awesome talent.

After years of looking at resumes and emails they’ve nailed the art of identifying super talented people to work with them. This quality control and insane standards ensure that when you work at Precog, you’re working with some of the smartest, brightest, most creative people you’ll ever cross paths with.

Feedback

Precog works on a system of feedback. Nobody is ever afraid to tell you when you’re slacking or not working hard enough. Although it maybe hard to swallow, it helps you bounce back quickly and produce cool output. It also works the other way around. Nobody at Precog is unwilling to listen, including PK. They welcome any and all constructive criticism that can help them improve themselves or make your experience at Precog better.

Nobody at Precog is ever afraid of failing. I’ve been told multiple times that it’s better to fail fast and correct quickly than to never fail at all and not know what you’re doing.

They love what they do.

Part of the reason why PK and his students are able to produce awesome output is because apart from being extremely talented, they’re super passionate about what they do. Don’t be surprised if you walk into one of our Deep Dive sessions to find a bunch of people in a heated discussion about the merits and demerits of somebody’s work.

They celebrate. A lot.

We celebrate a lot. We take part in each others joys and sadness. We’ve celebrated birthdays, work anniversaries, first days, last days, paper acceptances and paper rejections in some small way or the other, be it the full blown cake or the humble chai party at CDX.

Chilling.

Last but not the least, everybody at Precog knows how to really chill. Before I left from Chennai (in 2016), my mom said,

You’re going to be spending the summer with PhDs. They’re not a lot of fun and they study too much. You’re going to hate it there.

Her words could not be farther from the truth. In the one year that I’ve spent in Precog, I’ve really learnt how to strike a balance between working and having fun.

Overall, I’ve had a productive and fun year here at Precog and coming here was one of the best decisions I’ve made. I’ve changed a whole lot for the better from when I first came to Precog and the journey so far has been amazing.

 

Precog: A to Z

Hi, all.

I (Kartik Sethi, B.Tech. Final year at BITS Pilani, Hyderabad Campus) interned at the Precog Research Group of IIIT Delhi in the summers of 2017 (May – July). I have tried to express my experiences through the following paragraphs.

A – Amazing was the word, which flashed in my mind when the programme started.

B – Best environment and bonhomie was the hallmark of the internship. I found the environment and infrastructure in IIIT as one of the best in any such institution.

C – Challenges. Every difficult problem is usually entailed with an innovative solution and every new solution is associated with challenges of its own. I also did face many hurdles during the course of my projects, but the peers at Precog were always ready to offer help and render their valuable inputs.

D – Deep Dive. These are the fortnightly in-depth sessions similar to WhatsUps (more about it in later paragraphs) where people get opportunities to share their project ideas, their ongoing project progress and take relevant feedback from other participants. One important aspect to gain from these sessions was that regular feedback is an essential prerequisite for any important research project.

E – Exploring new vistas and avenues. We got so many opportunities to learn and experience new vistas, ideas, and avenues. This was the first time when I got the taste of what real hard-core research is. I got to experience all the nitty-gritties related to approaching a research problem.

F – Family. The atmosphere here at Precog is more like a family. A family, who gels together, discuss together, sits together, enjoys going out together, dining out together and group members coming forward to each other like a well-knit family.

G – GPUs. Precog has many CPU servers and 3 GPU servers (two NVIDIA GTX 1080 and one NVIDIA Titan X Pascal!, currently the best in the market) with high computational specs. My projects were related to Deep Learning, so I had the opportunity to tinker with these amazing tools.

H – Hackathons. During the course of the internship, we worked on some challenging problems in the form of Hackathon(s) where all of us (interns, PhDs, RAs) brainstormed and collaborated to find innovative solutions.

I – Interns. I got the opportunity to work and collaborate with some of the most ebullient and brightest minds of the country belonging to various reputed institutions. It was the ravenous attitude of everyone in the group to crack arduous research problems, that kept me going and made me do better and better. Overall, it was an amazing experience getting to know them, work and learn with them.

J – Journey.

“Success is a journey not a destination.” – Ben Sweetland

My journey at Precog was indeed a roller coaster ride, filled with momentary disappointments (in not achieving the desired results) and spans of joyful triumphs (when I actually figured out where I was going wrong).

K – Keenness to learn. The atmosphere at Precog brings out the best in you. The internship serves as a great platform to gauge your research interests and work in the direction of the research areas which one likes to pursue.

L – Learning. My projects were related to Artificial Neural Networks (namely CNNs and LSTMs). The problems that I tried to tackle allowed me to experience a holistic learning in terms of concepts and ideas that have been tried and the improvements that can be ensued.

M – Mahasabha. Also known as Intern Mahasabha, it is basically a one to one session with PK, where we can share our progress regarding the projects and also if we are facing any problems. The session is informal so one can discuss about other things as well, even not related to Precog.

N – Nostalgia. Once a Precoger, always a Precoger! 🙂

O – Openness. The openness of every member of Precog is admirable. You can approach anyone for help (even the Precog Alumni). One will surely receive new ideas to try and also, there might be moments of constructive criticism, which is necessary for getting results in any kind of research.

P – PK. I still remember that awe-inspiring moment when I first researched about PK and the work that has happened at Precog. PK as a supervisor is the coolest faculty one can ask for. He is an epitome of a mentor who motivates, guides and supports you to a great extent. He makes sure that every individual in the group gets ample opportunities to discover their true potential and so that they can hit the acme of their goals. It was a fabulous experience to work with him as his mentee. He is truly the glue that holds this (Precog) family together.

Q – The Quality of research at Precog is at par with other research institutes in the country.

R – RAs and Pillars. Research Associates and PhD students (also known as Pillars), which I must mention are the exact manifestation to what they are to us and the group itself. All of them were very helpful. They guided us, motivated us when we were not getting the desired results. Also, everyone likes to be called by their names, so don’t you dare call anyone Ma’am/Sir here (not even PK!). It’s a statutory compulsion, and fines for those who violate it. 😛

S – Socials. The group is not at all limited to only work, we had regular fun outings, also known as #PrecogSocial. The outings ranges from PK’s place (yeah, you got that right!) to Barbeque Nation, etc.

T – Tenacity. The tenacious work environment and challenging projects kept me driving throughout the course of the internship.

U – Ultimate experience. The overall experience was ultimate at this institution, where one could learn to any extent.

V – Precog helped by giving me a Vivid picture of what and what not I want to pursue in future.

W – WhatsUp (WU). Toned down version of DeepDives (DD), these are the bi-weekly sessions (with the entire group), where Precogers discuss their projects, ask for suggestions and give interesting inputs. Through sessions like WUs and DDs one gets to know about the different frontiers of research happening around you.

X – The Xenial relationship that I have shared with Precog is something that I will cherish for the rest of my life.

Y – There is a strong Yearning to return back to this place, whenever an opportunity strikes. 😀

Z – The Zealousness that I have seen in every Precoger, to solve problems related to social good is truly inspirational.

At the end, I would like to mention that Precog is a wonderful group to learn, work together and there are numerous opportunities where one could excel. Therefore, if someone is looking for an all round and comprehensive research experience or want to make a career in research, it is one of the best places for him/her to start their journey.

Here’s a glimpse of the Precog family.

The Journey Known as Precog

I was interested in Precog long before Precog was interested in me. Ever before I joined IIIT-Delhi, I had an innate fascination with the field of Security – especially how it affected us all in the digital age. So imagine my delight when I found out that IIIT-Delhi had an entire centre dedicated to Security, a.k.a, CERC (Cybersecurity Education and Research Centre). Among the several research groups that formed CERC, one of them was Precog.

What interested me most about Precog was its focus on security and privacy, especially in the context of online social media. To me this seemed like an issue which was of vital importance, especially given the prevalence of social media, but one that not enough of us thought about. The second thing that caught my eye was the person behind the creation of Precog. Professor Ponnurangam Kumaraguru, as he’s known to no one at all, is the enigma who brought the concept of Precog to life. PK, as he likes to be called, is one of the coolest people on campus, or so our seniors had informed us. Now, having worked with him and having taken nearly all of his classes, I can safely vouch for this fact. PK is unequivocally one of the best professors I’ve had the fortune of learning from.

Precog’s 6th anniversary celebrations!

Instead of making this blog post about the work that I did at Precog, or the work that Precog does in general, I’d like to focus on the philosophy behind Precog, and what makes this research group tick. First and foremost, Precog is like an extended family. People here like to help each other out. And I don’t say that lightly, they really do! We are encouraged to make use of each others expertise, rather than remain confined in the silos of our individual projects. What really enables this sort of collaboration is the fact that there is no formal hierarchy in the group. Free of the burden of labels such as ‘senior/junior’ or ‘undergrad/grad’ everyone is able to mingle freely with each other. This in my opinion truly brings out the best of each person in the group.

Secondly, I’d be remiss to not mention the influence of Professor Randy Pausch and his philosophy on our group (Here’s an intro for the uninitiated).

“The brick walls are there for a reason. The brick walls are not there to keep us out. The brick walls are there to give us a chance to show how badly we want something. Because the brick walls are there to stop the people who don’t want it badly enough. They’re there to stop the other people.”

These words were etched in my memory from the day I read The Last Lecture, and are the same words that hang on a picture on the fourth floor where Precog is located. PK in fact likes to share this quote in the very first class of all of his courses. It is a testament to how seriously, these words and Randy’s philosophy, are taken at Precog. I think all of us in Precog can thank Randy for the motivation to keep on going, no matter how tough it got.

Another valuable lesson for me that got reinforced at Precog, was of steady iteration. We as a group deliberately try and make progress in small and consistent steps, rather than making huge leaps in one go. This ideology has personally helped me streamline my work process and achieve my goals with great consistency. Keeping this idea in mind, we have weekly meetings whose sole purpose is to get everyone to give updates on their work. This is beneficial in many ways since everyone in the group is kept abreast of each other’s work, and everyone in the group gets the chance to weigh in on projects other than their own and give suggestions that may be useful in that project.

Lastly, the great thing about Precog is that it truly embodies the “Work hard, Play hard” attitude. When we work, then all our time and attention is focused on the task at hand. But from time to time, Precog organises outings for the entire group – ranging from going to eat, bowling, playing games, having competitions or just hanging out. For those who say that nerds don’t know how to have fun, I’d like to point you to Precog. Precog is a group that is very capable of having some good old fun.

Graduating Precogs with PK. Celebrating before everyone heads off to grad school!

I’ve learnt a great deal in my four years at IIIT-Delhi. Many different people have given me lessons that I will always cherish and remember. Precog is definitely one of them. I owe a great deal of my success to all of these people who have helped me become the person I am. So now, as I embark on my next great adventure – graduate school at the University of Cambridge, I just have to say that I will truly miss all of this: the Whatsup sessions, Deepdives, Brainstorming Meetings, Precog Socials, and the people. But one thing I can confidently say is that I am Precoger for life, and the work ethic that I’ve learnt here will always remain with me.

To all my juniors, I present this piece of advice – take one of PK’s classes, work with Precog on a project. In the end, you will be glad that you did.

Yashovardhan Sharma, signing off.

The Anatomy of a Precog Internship!

It all began in September 2016 when I saw a big informative picture (image below) in my Facebook feed. In big bold blue letters the picture said “Internship 2017” with Precog’s logo on the right side. I had heard a whole lot of awesome stuff about Precog from people in IIIT-D and didn’t think twice before applying. The selection process itself was quite rigorous and after a few interviews I got selected for an Internship at Precog in the summer of 2017!! Add to that the fact that PK told me I could join right when my semester gets over and my joy knew no bounds!

I distinctly remember my first meeting with the group was at 4 PM on 2nd December 2016. Introductions were shared and I got to meet my mentor Srishti Gupta. She told me all about the work going on at Precog and what all projects were on offer. Then came the difficult but cool part, I got to choose which project I want to work on! Given my interest and background in mathematics I chose a project which involved modelling the spread of information across online social networks. I worked throughout the month of December and the winter semester. In fact I got course credits for my work throughout December. My college’s faculty were intrigued to know the kind of work that I did in that period. To some disappointment our research on information flow did not reach a conclusive end. And here I realised another thing from Precog, getting feedback about your work and then striving ahead is something that’s part of the research cycle. Disappointment is meant to strengthen your desire to achieve more. Officially beginning my internship in June 2017, I worked on identifying malicious users using modern graph theory concepts across the humungous graph of an online social network. Part of the work cycle at Precog are the regular update meetings where one gets to learn about what others are working on and also get some help about issues anyone is facing. This accompanied by fortnightly sessions know as DeepDive which as the name goes, allow the team to get acquainted with all the projects at a more detailed level. The openness of the group is strengthened by the fact that anyone (even PK) can be reached out to for help. With such amazing ly versatile people working in a group, there’s very slim chance that you wouldn’t find help about something that you’re struggling with.

If by this line you’re thinking that Precog is all about work, work and just work, get ready for a change of thought. The regular get together is aptly named #PrecogSocial. There’s only one rule about this get together, don’t discuss work related stuff. And the location can vary from Barbeque Nation to PK’s own home. Yes you read that right, PK invited all of us to his house for a feast. Get together aside, the interesting part about #PrecogSocial was the stories and anecdotes that everybody shares. The jokes, the games, the food, all of it will be cherished for a long time. Sir/Ma’am are a thing of the past at Precog, in fact everybody insists calling them by their name. If you try to associate the common academic stereotypes with this group and it’s people, you’d fail miserably.

If you’re a hardware fanatic (I am too :p), you’d be even happier at Precog. Want to run a deep learning model and want the results fast? Why not, use one of the many Nvidia GTX 1080s. Want to run it even faster and feel the raw power of GPUs? Go ahead and use the Titan X Pascal, awarded to Precog specially by Nvidia. And even if you’re not the GPU type, one of the many high performance servers are at your disposal. This is backed up by really fast NAS servers for all your storage needs. Although I haven’t been able to use the GPUs till now because my work doesn’t entail their use, I wouldn’t miss any opportunity to play around with them.

The Precog experience has been absolutely amazing for me right from the beginning. There was no shred of doubt in my mind when I decided to continue my work here after the official internship period ended. As many Precog alums say, Precog is not just a research group, it is a family. A family consisting of people who are awesome at what they do simply because they absolutely love doing it. As the great Randy Pausch once said “Follow your passions, believe in karma, and you won’t have to chase your dreams, they will come to you.”

Here’s a picture of the team at Barbeque Nation for one of the #PrecogSocial

A stay of 2 months: An experience of lifetime

Like every engineering student, when I took admission in engineering college I had high hopes and ambitions of doing something big and worthy. But the monotonous curriculum, seniority dogma, student-faculty gap never provided conducive environment for research and those high ambitions somehow faded away. Engineering seemed to be limited to only what was there in textbooks. However when I finished my summer internship this year (2017) at Precog, I suddenly experienced a revival of my engineering ambitions. People around were working and building stuffs that are being applied to solve real world problems and being one of them was like dream come true! My stay at precog was the most enriching part of my academic life.

My project supervisor, Prof Ponnurangam Kumaraguru (PK) is the most awesome teacher I ever had. My journey with Prof. PK virtually began in fall 2016, when I took up his online course Privacy & Security in Online Social Media on NPTEL. I was looking for domains where I could apply my knowledge of computer science to solve real world problems, when I stumbled upon this course. Back then I was in 3rd year of my BTech study and was aiming for a summer internship at some premier research centers during my forthcoming summer vacation. Few weeks into the NPTEL course, I was so fascinated by the  course contents and teaching of PK, I absolutely made up my mind to do internship under him. Some time after the course had ended, I mailed PK with my SoP and CV, explaining why I wish to work at precog and how my interests and previous works align with the research domains pursued at precog. Few days later, I got a mail from him and after 3 rigorous rounds of selection process, I finally got selected for my much coveted internship.

My project at precog was on Information Overloading with Niharika Sachdeva as my mentor and guide. I primarily worked to figure out how the frequency of posting affects the engagement on posts made by police pages/handles on Facebook and twitter. Will write a separate blog on my technical work. Getting a conclusion from the large dataset was however not easy and took me weeks of failed analytics and experimenting with different statistical measures on the data. The best thing about precog is that it pushes you to your limits. I used to spend most of the time in the lab, highest being 18 hours. Lab hours never got boring, as I was always surrounded by hardworking and awesome people round the clock. People around were always ready to provide helping hand, be it professional or personal.

My most favorite thing at precog used to be WhatsUps  (regular meetups held twice a week) as it facilitated interaction with everyone, including PK, and also getting to know each other’s work. It thrilled listening to exciting work going around. Then there were detailed discussion sessions known as #DeepDive (a nightmare for me though :p) where one has to elaborately explain their work, codes, hypothesis, observations etc. I used to be highly concerned about DeepDives as I had to be prepared for most unanticipated questions and criticisms. The suggestions, criticisms and feedback however helped me a lot in refining the work done and coming up with better results. Here everyone was keen to help whenever I got stuck in something.

IIIT Delhi also had some surprises for me, that were to break my prejudices I had about educational institutions. I belong to a government engineering college; and being from a government college I am not used to niceness of professors and research scholars. I am used to professional barrier between students & teachers and undergrads & scholars. But starting from my day 1, I was extremely surprised how people were at precog. There is absolutely no professional protocol existing, like addressing research scholars as sir/madam, following a strict formal conversation style with them etc etc. These were something I was never used to, and it took me some weeks to get adjusted to. Everyone is friendly irrespective of them being PhD scholars, MTech scholars or RA’s. We cracked jokes, played games, went out for lunch. The person who made the most difference is PK himself. He is the most wonderful and friendly teacher I ever met and is completely different from conventional teachers. He invited us for dinner at his place, watched movie with us, took part in fun games; somethings hardly any professor does these days. He emphasizes on “Work hard, play harder”, thus apart from work related stuffs, he organizes fun gatherings and outings (we call it precog social). My best memory with him is this selfie. Its the first time I ever had a selfie with a professor!!

What I got from precog is experience, and as Randy Pausch aptly says

Experience is what you get when you didn’t get what you wanted. And experience is often the most valuable thing you have to offer.

Being in Precog was much like being a part of a big family. It feels great being in such a group of highly talented and knowledged people working on really cool stuff that are making a difference in how online social media is used. I am super delighted to have worked with these awesome people. Can’t have a summer better than this!!!

Here’s the glimpse of precog family of which I was a part of.